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Jawa Boot/Shoe Tutorial

 
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Just Ducky (Jessie Lynch)
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Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 180
Location: Central MD
Medals: None

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 4:42 pm    Post subject: Jawa Boot/Shoe Tutorial Reply with quote

Intro
Boots for a Jawa costume are decidedly not an exact art. No two should look the same, because no two Jawas are the same. These are scavengers, and the boots are made from bits of cloth and robes that couldn’t be salvaged or used any longer. The boots are dragged through the sand, and as such may be far more heavily weathered than any other part of the costume.

Keep in mind how sand gathers on things, and how the sun effects fabrics - remember - Tatooine is a dry, dusty, sunny place! Don’t worry too much about messing up, or missing spots - layering bits of tattered fabric onto the shoes just makes them all the more realistic. Have fun with this.

Materials Needed:
- Boots or shoes - at least above the ankle, or apply this to spats/boot covers.
-- It is best to use a pair of comfortable shoes or boots as the base, with little or no heel. Ones that can slide on without using zippers are the best, as you will likely end up gluing the zipper shut at some point.
- Optional: Brown Cotton Fabric
-- If you are using a lower shoe base that does not meet the minimum height, you may need to make a spat or boot cover the shoe and work with that in a similar way. I have not tried to make one of those.
- Fabric scraps of the same material as your robes and hood.
-- You should save just about any trimming or odd shaped piece of fabric as you are making your robes. Even the pieces that are fraying a bit.
-- Some of the best pieces are the ones that were at the zig-zagged edge of the fabric before it was washed. This fraying and squiggly bits are really useful for making it look rough.
-- If someone else made the robes for you, and you do not have access to the scraps, you can get a small amount of rough woven fabric (Monks Cloth) and dye it to match. About a yard should be fine.
- Hot Glue (and/or E6500)
-- Get more than you think you will need. I used at least two tubes of the E6500, and a whole bag of high temp glue sticks.
-- Always have extra in case of repairs.
-- I find that E6500 seeps in to leather and fabric, and doesn’t hold as well. Hot glue seems like the best choice.
-- They do make hot glue specifically for fabric. It will survive washes, and stays more flexible.
- Shoe Goo
-- For creating the soles and sealing the bottom. Necessary for traction and keeping the shoes safe when outside.
- Sand colored acrylic paint
-- I used “sandstone” but any vaguely beige color will work.
- Sponges, brushes, and paper towels
-- For use when you are weathering with paint. Allows for layering and dabbing on the sandy color.
- Optional: Pool Noodle
-- If you are working with calf or knee high boots, a pool noodle is perfect for stabilizing the surface as you glue things on.

((More posts coming))
_________________
~ Jessica Lynch ~
Terrapin Base
Jedi Knight - Jayjan Thek
Jawa - Duk'ki
OT Rebel Pilot - Fable "Needles" Thek - Chesapeake Ten
Twi'lek Jedi Librarian - WIP
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Just Ducky (Jessie Lynch)
Active Legion Member


Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 180
Location: Central MD
Medals: None

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Preparing the Fabric

- If needed, dye the fabric to match your robes
-- I used RIT Brown (2 Bottles) and Sunshine Orange (1 bottle) to dye my fabric.
- Zig zag stitch about .5” to 1” away from the edge of the fabric before dying and washing.
-- If working with scraps, arrange them by size, keeping the largest pieces for the main body, and tiny scraps for adding some “weathering fraying” which I’ll address later.
-- I had a baggy of just tiny little trimmings that came in super handy. Pieces about an inch or so are perfect for covering up missed spots.

1. Take some of the largest scraps, and cut them into strips about 1.5” x 2’
-- No need to be exact with the width. Just hack them up. It is best if you do this on somewhat of an angle across the grain, because you can pull and fray things easier.
-- Taper the ends to a point on a few of them. It seems to help with transitions between pieces, and gives more changes for fraying.
-- Keep the selvage edges as strips in a separate pile. They make an excellent top layer.
2. Take some of the smaller scraps and cut them into squares or rounded shapes, about 3” x 3”

Wrapping the Boots

1. Use the pool noodles to help the boots stay upright while you work with them, especially if you have higher boots.
2. Start at the toe of the boot, with one of the squarish pieces. Glue it flat with Hot Glue or E6500 - it is ok if the edges crinkle and wrinkle a bit, texture is good. Make sure it wraps under the bottom of the shoe a little bit to cover all the pieces of the original color.
3. Take another, similarly sized pieces, and glue it around the heel of the boot so that it is coming up from the sole around the base of the boot. Make sure to glue it down thoroughly. This will end up overlapped later.

Start of the Wrapping Process, beside an unwrapped boot.

4. Take some of the longer strips, and use E6500 or Hot Glue to adhere them to the boot, overlapping the original piece you added slightly.
5. Start at either the side, or the sole of the shoe, adhering it with a generous amount of glue. Press the fabric gently into the glue so that it’ll stick, but not so hard as the glue seeps out from under the fabric. If there is some that seeps out, this is fine. Just don’t glue the shoe to anything.
6. Apply the glue in squiggles about the width of your fabric strip an inch at a time, and press the fabric down into it before proceeding. Always try to overlap the previous layer at least a little bit as you wrap.
-- Don’t put the glue all the way up to the edge, so that you can pull and fray these strips a bit for weathering.
7. Once you get to the end of the strip, tack it down with extra glue and press firmly.
8. Grab another strip, and overlap the end of the previous one a bit, wrapping it around the shoe as though you were wrapping a mummy, a little bit at a time.
-- If you miss spots, or there are any places that appear to be loose, or you can still see the underlying fabric, don’t worry, we will go back over them in a bit.
9. Continue in this manner all the way up and around the boot. Overlap a little bit of the previous layer, to make it wrap.
-- Wrinkles are perfectly fine every now and then in the wrapping
-- When in doubt, leave some frayed edges and such. Layers are good.
-- Always keep in mind that these are scavengers who would be patching things up as they went, fixing stuff here and there. Imperfections in the boots are a good thing!
-- Thoroughly hot glue things to the bottom of the boot or shoes. Otherwise they may slip and move a but.

Jawa boots (before painting/sand/weathering), after all the wrapping is done.

10. Once you get all of the wraps done, go back through and check for spots that were missed a little bit. This is where the little scrappy bits come in.
11. Use hot glue to tack down the edges that are lifting, and resecure things.
-- You will likely need to go back and do this fairly regularly as you troop. Points that wear and move a lot.
Jawa boots details. Make sure to glue down bits like this that lift up.

12. Find some of the spots with loose threads, and tug them so that the fabric starts to unravel a little. If they are too long, trim them down a little, but leave some of the loose threads dangling.
-- Save those threads you just pulled for the next step.
13. Take the tiny scraps, and using a tiny dab of hot glue, press the edge of the scrap into place. Tug off any loose threads, and repeat as needed.
-- It is great for covering overlapping bits that need some extra flare. Anywhere that looks a little too neat.


Hot glue bits and pieces on. Finger guards are useful for not burning your fingerprints off. I got them at the craft store.

14. Repeat these steps until you are satisfied with the roughness. And if you aren’t, you can adjust later and add more bits.
-- You just want to make sure that any of the base fabric/leather of the boots are hidden by the fabric you are using
15. Try them on… make sure you can still slip them on, since zippers are likely no longer available.

Up next, weathering! Now for the fun part!
_________________
~ Jessica Lynch ~
Terrapin Base
Jedi Knight - Jayjan Thek
Jawa - Duk'ki
OT Rebel Pilot - Fable "Needles" Thek - Chesapeake Ten
Twi'lek Jedi Librarian - WIP
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Just Ducky (Jessie Lynch)
Active Legion Member


Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 180
Location: Central MD
Medals: None

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weathering

Now for the fun part. You don’t need to weather them too terribly much, since they won’t be seen much. But they are also the part of the outfit that would be most in contact with sand and rough conditions… so overweathering isn’t really possible.

Preparing the Materials
- Have some paper towels on hand, for both cleanup and roughing the paint up.
- Dry brushes and sponges
- Paper plate, lid, or scrap cardboard for use as a palette
- Sandy, Beige Colored Acrylic Paint
- Wrapped boots

1. Squeeze some of the sand colored acrylic paint onto your palette
2. Get a little bit of paint on the dry brush - do not load it up too much
3. Starting at the toe, brush the paint onto the fabric, a little at a time
-- Focus on the edges of the fabric strips, folds and wrinkles
-- Anywhere that it seems like sand would gather should get a brushing of paint
-- Anywhere that would have been exposed to the sun can stand to have some paint too.
4. Before the paint dries, take a balled up paper towel, and wipe/rub the paint in to fabric.
-- This will give it a feeling of the sand being ground into the boots, and lets you remove any excess paint.
-- Don’t worry about being too rough with this, you can always go back and re-hot glue the fabric down if it starts lifting.
5. Repeat the dry-brush process with a little more paint to layer the sandy look, gradually building up the paint.
-- If you feel like you have too much, just rub it around a little bit with the paper towels. This gives it a ground-in look.
6. Continue with this until you’ve got some sand weathering all over the boots.
-- There should be a little less sand the higher up you get, since the sand doesn’t necessarily go that high on the boots.
-- You should still be able to see original cloth color on all the pieces, and should not weather to the point where they are entirely sand colored.
7. Occasionally take a step back and look at the weathering process. Sometimes it is really easy to get caught in the tiny details!

The little details. Rubbing the paint in also helps to fray the fabric underneath. You can see that the paint was used to accentuate the folds and creases, and ground into the fabric in order to make the weathering gradual. Make sure you get some of the trailing scrappy threads with the paint, too!

8. Go back with your hot glue gun and tack down any bits that came up while you were weathering it.


All finished! Taking a look at the complete look. Sandy, but not too sandy.

Let the weathering dry, and take a look at your finished work! Pool noodles should be left in to keep the boots from flopping over while its drying.
_________________
~ Jessica Lynch ~
Terrapin Base
Jedi Knight - Jayjan Thek
Jawa - Duk'ki
OT Rebel Pilot - Fable "Needles" Thek - Chesapeake Ten
Twi'lek Jedi Librarian - WIP
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Just Ducky (Jessie Lynch)
Active Legion Member


Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 180
Location: Central MD
Medals: None

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finishing Touches

The last step is sealing the bottom with Shoe Goo. This stuff smells awful and has some unpleasant fumes… so make sure you have ventilation when you do this!

Bottom of the boots, all sealed up. Pool noodles used to keep them upright while drying.

- I used almost an entire tube of shoe-goo on the bottom of the shoes.
- Use the finger cot thing to spread the goo over the bottom of the shoe. They are, by nature, stick resistant, so it's a good use for it.
- You want to make sure any of fabric bits that were wrapped under get nice and coated in the goo to keep them sealed.
- Let this dry, upside down so it doesn’t adhere to anything.

You'll probably want to add more to the bottom over time. It'll wear off as you troop in them.

Hope this helps someone out. If you have any questions, feel free to ask questions.

Happy trooping!


All put together with the finished robes shown above!
_________________
~ Jessica Lynch ~
Terrapin Base
Jedi Knight - Jayjan Thek
Jawa - Duk'ki
OT Rebel Pilot - Fable "Needles" Thek - Chesapeake Ten
Twi'lek Jedi Librarian - WIP
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View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
QuinGin ()
Active Legion Member


Joined: 01 Apr 2017
Posts: 17
Location: Plano, TX
Medals: None

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for doing this tutorial! I added a link to it in the boots section of my to do list Smile
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