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Anakin AOTC's Robe/Cloak
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KrisAntilles (Amanda Burk)
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:24 pm    Post subject: Anakin AOTC's Robe/Cloak Reply with quote

Does anyone have any good reference pictures and/or construction/reference material on Anakin's AOTC cloak outside of the Padawan guide?

I'm trying to figure out how this cloak is constructed around the shoulders and back of the neck (underneath the hood).

It looks like the tabards are a double thickness, constructed like the normal tabards, but maybe make a U shape around the back of the neck where the hood attaches? Then the rest of the cloak flows down from there? But I'm not sure, it's hard to tell.







Was watching AOTC and pausing to look at the cloak last night, but he never really had his hood up in that one, so you never really get a good look at the back side.

I think there's a center seam down the back of the cloak, but I'm not totally sure on that. It kind of looked like there was a center seam during the scene with Anakin in Palpatine's office.

There's definitely some side seams where the back of the cloak attaches to the sides/"draping sleeves" of the cloak. If you watch the scene when they first arrive on Tatooine, Anakin picks up Watto's droid to work on it. When he lifts his arm to work on the droid, the sun shines through his cloak and there's a very obvious side seam there.

It doesn't have to be exact I guess, since it's just for my generic jedi. But I basically replicated Obi-Wan's robe for my other jedi, and am thinking about replicating Anakin's cloak for this costume, since I kind of like the sleeveless cloak option for this costume.

But I've read the Anakin cloak likes to slide off the back too easy. And needs extra strapping to hold it on. Anyone perfected this?

Any tips or info or pictures you have on this cloak would be appreciated! Thanks!
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might want to look at the Royal Guard robe construction with the following modifications:

The center seam in the back is completely sewn down.
The front panel is cut open.
There is a hood attached.
The front panels are cut in such a way as to attach together around the back of the neck.

If you make the front panels double thick, then they would have the same weight as the rear panels and hold it forward. Otherwise, the back would be a standard fit-shoulder cape pattern.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although I've not made an Anakin ATOC robe (yet), what I would try first with a mock up is...

Well, first....to my eyes, Anakin's ATOC robe looks like a basic (what I call) Jedi Master's Robe, only without sleeves and where the front panel is narrower (more like a tabard). In the ref pics you show, it seems the shoulder has a seam (or a VERY-VERY) short shoulder tuck. I'd need to research it more to see what it is...because I simply don't trust the display costumes seen at the various exhibits. Some are clearly NOT what was seen or worn in the films (and there's many reasons for this that I won't get into).

Anyway...for a mock up, I would take the Jedi Master's Robe pattern (from my tutorial), eliminate the sleeves, then hem the arm side of the "tabard" to not only get a hem, but to also achieve that shoulder seam effect. The rest of the robe (the hood) I'd leave the same.

Some folks say some of Anakin's hoods are double thickness. Maybe so....but I've made a Plo Koon robe (tutorial coming), which has a tabard/hood complex that is double thickness. It looks awesome, but is terribly impractical where I live (in the very-VERY hot South). For such a robe around my area, I'd probably alter it a bit for practicality yet be as screen accurate as possible. I will say that, Anakin ATOC costume will be another (of many) Jedi costume standards that we'll update in the near future. I'll definitely have done some more research by then.

Anywho, you're WIPs are astounding. If you manage an Anakin ATOC style robe, we'd greatly appreciate a "how to" Wink
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Holy flippin' Yoda, I think I just hit the screencaps jackpot!!

http://starwarsscreencaps.com/star-wars-episode-ii-attack-of-the-clones-2002/

I didn't think about the Royal Guard robe, but I'll definitely check it out, and see what I can apply to making the Anakin cloak.

Yeah, I'm hoping the double layer of the tabards will help hold it forward. Might be able to stick a layer of broadcloth in between to give it a little more weight.

I don't think that shoulder seam is a tuck, but not sure. The double layer of material from the tabards comes up over the shoulder (then I think curves around under the hood), but the back of the cloak is a single layer of material. So I think what looks like a "tuck" is double layer of fabric one side and single layer of fabric on the other side, with all the seam ends folded into the double layer side. I think. I'll have to play around with it some.









I think you're right on the double layer hood. I'm not seeing a hem on the inside like with Obi-Wan's hood. Guess we'll see how much material I have. Since this is for a generic jedi, I can go either way. I'm in Michigan, so we can have temps anywhere from 0 to 90+. lol!





After cruising through the screencaps, we never really see the back of Anakin's cloak under the hood. So I guess I make that part up the best I can. I think I have some ideas.

Yeah, the more I look at that exhibit robe vs the screen shots, that exhibit robe has a couple issues, mainly with how the hood is attached I believe.

Here's a couple of the screencaps where it looks like there's a seam down the back of the cloak:





And a screencap of what I was seeing with the side seam:


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! I will follow this very closely I am hoping it will reveal something for me.

I need that robe for my epii
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I powered my way through two god awful ugly mockups (ugly because of the scrap fabric colors/combinations used, though one looks like something Lando might wear.....) yesterday. I think I'm pretty close, but need to figure out a few things still. Will try another mockup later this week or this weekend. Need to dig up some more scrap fabric! lol!
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Justin from SOTS said it was of a brick like texture
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've made one. it's 3 pieces.
1 - semi-circle cape -- same profile as Darth Vader's cape --
(there's a quote from Trisha Biggar where she states explicitly, she copied Vader's silhouette for this costume).
2 - U-shaped Tabbard -- goes around the neck, under the hood -- hangs down in front as 2 "panels".**
3 - double-lined hood. pleated at the neckline.


**what some see to be "shoulder tucks", are really just the edge of the U-shaped tabbard.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v355/cope2392/starwars2-movie-screencaps_com-8457_zps444e0a6e.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v355/cope2392/Anakin-Padme_zpsa4460547.jpg
3 layers: hood, tabbard, cape; tabbard goes under the hood, around the neck, in a U-shape.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v355/cope2392/diane_anakin3_zpse55a2fe7.jpg
3 layers: hood, tabbard, cape; tabbard goes around the neck, under the hood, in a U-shape.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v355/cope2392/k_anakin_zps7cfedd31.jpg
3 layers: cape, tabbard, hood: tabbard goes around the neck, under the hood, you get the picture.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v355/cope2392/starwars2-movie-screencaps_com-11833_zps86d7cb55.jpg
note: the side edge of the tabbard is tacked to the front edge of the cape, with a single stitch -- I did this too -- it prevents the rig from sliding backwards and falling off your shoulders.

Quote:

If you make the front panels double thick, then they would have the same weight as the rear panels and hold it forward.

yes.
this (also) prevents the rig from sliding backwards and falling off your shoulders.

make the U-shaped tabbard to be 3 layers thick ; make the semi-circle cape to be 1 layer thick ;
the tabbard will act as a counterweight, to balance the pull of the cape.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good news, Kira!

You gonna post some pics? (hint-hint) Wink
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am! as soon as I start Wink
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just had someone ask me about a pattern for this, and I just realized I never finished drawing up the pattern I had worked out for this. Oops! Guess I better work on that!
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome! I would still love to see that ^^
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, good news. I picked up some mockup fabric this week and have started sewing together a mock up and taking step by step pictures as I go. I figured that would be easier than taking pictures of the already "complete" mockups I had done and trying to explain how it was assembled. So this way I can write up more of a "tutorial" on making this cloak. So stay tuned! I'll probably work on the "tutorial" in pieces in this thread, then move it up to the tutorials section when it's complete.

Bad news....I'm having some shoulder pain issues right now with my right shoulder. Years of the very ergonomically incorrect set up of my home desktop computer mouse and keyboard and working on a computer all day at work are taking their toll. I'm fine if I stay off the home computer, but too much time on it and OUCH! So I'm limiting my computer use a bit right now and keeping home computer time short, which means it's going to take me a little while to write up the tutorial and part of the reason I'll probably write it up in pieces.

Good news.....I am beginning the hunt for a laptop for use at home so I don't have to use my desktop much. Because unfortunately the ergonomically incorrect set up of my desktop isn't all that fixable. lol. So hopefully in the coming weeks I'll be up and running again with a laptop. Wink
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All sounds great, not the shoulder pain of course!
but take your time no need to cause unnessesary pain Smile
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From looking at different screen caps, pictures, and exhibit pics, I believe Anakin's cloak breaks down to:

- hood
- one long tabard
- two triangular back panels
- two triangular side panels

It's hard to find a good picture of the back of Anakin's cloak at the neck that's actually in focus, but from what I can tell, there doesn't appear to be a center seam in the tabard at the back of his neck. It's hard to tell for sure, but I'm going to go with there being no center seam in the tabard, but you can be the judge. Here's a couple of the best pics I was able to find.

Collar Pic 1
Collar Pic 2

Working under the assumption that the tabard has no center seam, this means that the tabard of the cloak is one really long piece that runs from the floor, up around the back of the neck, and back down to the floor. So you're going to need a very long, continuous piece of fabric to cut your tabard out from.

To figure out how long you need to make your tabard, put on your jedi boots, stand up straight, and have someone measure from the center of the back of your neck where the cloak collar would sit, over your shoulder, and down the front to the top of your boot. For me this was 60 inches. Now add 2 inches for hem allowance. Then add 3 or 4 inches to that for "screw up". This will make your tabard way too long, but you can always cut the extra fabric off before you hem, but you can't add fabric on if you "screwed up" your measurement and make the tabard too short. So it's best to err on the side of caution and add the extra length.



Now take that measurement and times it by two. This will give you the full lengh that your tabard needs to be. So for me, the full length measurement came out to:

60" neck to floor + 2" hem + 4" screw up = 66" for one half of tabard
66" x 2 = 132" for tabard length

For the width of the tabard, I used 7.5 inches (7" width plus .5" seam allowance). But you'll need to adjust that measurement to what looks proportional to your body shape and build. I'm 5'6" and 130 lbs. So a broad shouldered man is probably going to need a wider tabard width than me. Start with making a cheap fabric mockup first, so you can adjust your measurements for the final product. That way you know you've got everything right before you cut into your expensive fabric.

Anakin's cloak tabard is cut on the fold, because if you look at pictures of his cloak, you can tell that there is only a seam on the outside edge of the tabard and not on the inside edge. So the tabard is cut on the fold.

Inside tabard edge appears to just be a fold
Outside tabard edge appears to have seam

So, to cut out your tabard, find somewhere that you have plenty of room to work, and lay out your fabric, folding it along the long edge with right sides of the fabric together. For this tutorial I'm just using cotton muslin fabric, since I'm not planning on making a final product of this cloak for myself. But I figured the muslin would work for demonstrating how to put this cloak together.

(Really sorry if the quality of these pictures aren't the greatest in the world. The lighting in my house just isn't that great, especially on an overcast winter day, so I did the best I could.)



Pin down your folded fabric so it doesn't shift around on you. Now measure 132 inches down the length of the fabric and mark that. Then measure 7.5 inches in from the fold in several places and mark the fabric. Then using a yard stick, connect those marks to form a line to follow to cut out your tabard. (For making your fabric, you can use fabric marking pens that either wash out or ones that fade away within 24 hours, or for dark fabrics, you can use fabric marking chalk.) So now you have your tabard drawn out 7.5 inches wide and 132 inches long.

(If you click on the image and view it full size, you should be able to see the blue lines of my marking pen. Sorry, that's the darkest color marking pen I had to work with.)



Go ahead and cut out your tabard. I left mine pinned together along the ends and only removed some of the pins in the center to eventually add the hood. Leaving it pinned together helped keep things lined up for stitching them together later on. I will tell you this style of cloak really seems to want to slide off the back pretty easy, due to the weight of the hood and the fabric at the back. So one suggestion I'll make would be to maybe interface your tabard with interfacing or another fabric to help give the tabard a little more stiffness and a little more weight in the front to try to help counter balance it a bit to help it stay on your shoulders better.



Now I think Anakin's tabard narrows some at the back of the neck. I don't know for sure, since we never see under his hood, but from some of the pictures I've seen, his tabard at the top of the shoulders seems to curve around and go under the hood a little too quickly for the tabard to be the same width at the back of the neck that it is down the sides.

Tabard at shoulder 1
Tabard at shoulder 2

So I think the tabard has a notch cut out of it at the back of the neck. But regardless of whether or not Anakin's tabard does have a notch cut out of it at the back of the neck, I've found that if you do put a notch in the back of the tabard, it really helps it to curve around the back of your neck better and lay much nicer down the front, and seems to also help a little bit with keeping it on, since this cloak does like to try to slide off the back when you move. So I added a notch to the back of my tabard.

First I folded the tabard in half at the center. Then drew the following notch on my fabric and cut it out. You'll need to play with the measurements a little bit to see what works for you.







Here's what that notch looks like once it's draped around the neck.





At this point, set your tabard aside for now, because we need to work on the hood. If you look at Anakin's hood, his hood has no center seam at the top of the hood. His hood also has no hem or seam of any kind around the face opening of the hood. This means the face opening of his hood is cut on the fold, and that his hood is made from a double layer of fabric, unlike the single layer of fabric with hem of the more Obi-Wan style robe hood.

Hood pic 1
Hood pic 2

So to make the Anakin hood, I grabbed the pattern piece I had used for the hood of my Obi-Wan style robe, because I knew that already had the drape I needed, and adjusted it slightly to work for Anakin's hood. Mainly I narrowed the width of the hood pattern to remove the hem allowances that Obi-Wan's hood had. But basically I started with a rectangle 20 inches wide by 27 inches tall. Then rounded one of the corners.



First, fold your fabric in half along the long edge. This creates the fold around the face opening of the hood.



Next, fold your fabric in half again along the short edge. This creates the seamless center at the top of the hood.



So now you'll have four layers of fabric. Place your hood pattern piece on top of your fabric.



Leave the fold at the face opening and the fold at the top of the hood in tack, only cut the fabric at the neckline, back of the hood, and the rounded part of the hood.



Now open your hood all the way up and lay it out flat. Then fold it in half along the top of the hood with right sides of the fabric together. Pin together the back and curve of the hood on both sides.



Stitch the back and curve of the hood together on both sides with a straight stitch. Then serge the edges or use an overlocking stitch or zig zag stitch on your sewing machine. This prevents the fabric from fraying. It isn't a big deal if the fabric frays some, since both of these seams will be on the inside of the hood where they'll never been seen. But if you're using a loose weave fabric, you also don't want these two seams rubbing around a lot inside the hood and eventually fraying to the point that your hood seam start coming apart. So using some kind of an overlock stitch will prevent that from happening. I used red thread to sew this together to try to help you see my stitch lines a little better. I don't own a serger yet, so I just used one of the overlock stitches on my machine.





Next turn your hood right side out, so your two back seams are on the inside and the wrong sides of the fabric are together on the inside.



Now turn the neckline opening of your hood a quater turn, so your two back steams are now together and lay the neckline of your hood flat and pin the neckline together.





Stitch the two sides of the neckline together to help your hood hold it's shape and make it a little easier to work with later on. Keep you stitch very close to the edge of the fabric. I didn't even straight stitch mine, I just used a overlock stitch to tack the two sides of the neckline together and helps keep them from fraying as well. But keep whatever stitch you use as close to the edge of the fabric as you can.





Now push one layer of fabric inside the other, and now you have your completed double layered hood!



The weird thing with Anakin's hood, is that the inside edge of his tabard is cut on the fold and has no seam, yet his hood is attached to that inside edge of the tabard and seems to be coming through a seam in the tabard. Yet you can't see any visible stitch lines that attach the hood, and there's that funny little fabric fold in the tabard at the end of both sides of the hood.

Hood attached to tabard

This tripped me up for a while, but after experimenting with a few different things and mockups, I think I finally figured it out, or close to it anyway. So here's the method I came up with to attach the hood and make it look like the movie cloak.

Get your tabard back out, and unpin the center part of your tarbard and open the fold, laying it down flat with wrong side of fabric down and right side of fabric up.



Anakin's hood appears to run roughly from collar bone to collar bone around the neck of his tabard.

Hood neckline 1
Hood neckline 2

So measure yourself from collar bone on one side, around behind the neck, to collar bone on the other side. Ideally with your jedi tuincs and tabards on, so the bulk of the fabric for your tunics and tabards are taken into account. For me, 18 inches seemed to be a good measurement.

Once you have the measurement you're going to use, first mark the very center of your tabard. Next cut your measurement from above in half, so for me 9 inches, and then measure and mark 9 inches to the left and 9 inches to the right of your center mark.





Place your hood on the tabard, lining the neckline of the hood up along the center fold of your tabard. Pin the center seam at the back of your hood to the center mark you made on your tabard. Now pin the ends of your hood to each of the other two marks you made that are 9 inches from center.



Now pleat your hood to take up the extra fabric at the neck line and pin your pleats in place.



Stitch your pleated hood to the tabard, keeping your stitch line close to the bottom of the hood. Try to keep it around 1/4" or 3/8" from the bottom of the hood/center fold of the tabard. You want to keep this stitch low, so we know it's hidden when we make the next seam. Also, don't stitch beyond the end of the hood on either the left or the right.





Now fold your tabard in half again, so the neckline of your hood sits in the center fold of your tabard. Pin the tabard in place.



Stitch the hood down again by stitching through the hood and both layers of the tabard. Make sure you keep this seam line above the last one you stitched, so keep this one around 1/2" above the fold of the tabard. That way you know your previous seam line will be hidden down inside this one. But this time instead of stopping at both edges of the hood, you're going to continue to stitch about 1/2" past the edge of the hood on both sides, and then back stitch/forward stitch three or four times in the 1/2" space. You want to make sure both ends of this seam line are very secure!! Because the ends of this seam seem like they could come apart easily if they're not well secured and would be a royal pain to fix once your cloak is complete. Stitching about 1/2" past the edge of the hood also seems to successfully create these funny folds you see in Anakin's tabard.





And your hood is successfully attached to your tabard!

Lay out tabards out and pin them together with right sides of the fabric together.



Starting at the end of one of the tabards, stitch the long side of the tabard together, but only go just over 3/4 of the way up to the hood and stop. Repeat with the tabard on the other side of the hood, again only stitching to just over 3/4 of the way up to the hood and stop. I stitched these with a straight machine stitch. And also stitches the edges with an overlocking stitch to prevent further fraying.





Now set your tabards aside. Time to work on the back of the cloak.

I believe the back of Anakin's cloak is made from four pieces. Here's why.

If you look at this screencap, his cloak appears to have a center seam down the back:
Anakin cloak back seam

And if you look at this screencap, his cloak definitaly has a side seam:
Anakin cloak side seam

His cloak is also really full, which gives it that Vaderish profile and flow:
Anakin cloak fullness

If you look at the back of his cloak, you'll notice that it is much more full toward the bottom than it is toward the top, which leads me to believe it's a type of circle cape, much like the Vader cape:
Anakin cloak back fullness

Another thing I noticed is that his cloak seems to hang fairly straight down the back along the back seam, with most of the gathering happening more toward the sides:
Anakin cloak back 1
Anakin cloak back 2
Anakin cloak back 3

So given all that, I believe the back of Anakin's cloak is made from four separate panels, cut as four big right angle trangles. After a lot of trial and error, here's the method I came up with that seems to come pretty close to looking like Anakin's cloak.

Put your boots on, stand up straight, and have someone measure you from the base of the neck where you're collar sits to the floor. For me, this was 56 inches. Add 2 inches for a hem, and I added about 4 inches for screw up, because it's better to have it too long, than too short!

56" down back + 2" hem + 4" screw up = 62"

You'll want to make sure the sides of your four triangle pieces are no shorter than this measurement, or if they are shorter, then make sure it's not by much (another reason we add the "screw up"). Now you'll need to add about 13 inches to that measurement. You'll understand why later on.

62" + 13" = 75"

The fabric I'm working with for my back panels is 60 inches wide. The narrower your fabric, the less full your cloak will be. The wider your fabric, the more full your cloak will be. 60 inch wide fabric seems to work pretty well to give roughly the movie fullness to the cloak. (If you only have 45 inch wide fabric to work with, then you may need to cut out two extra panels, and assemble your cloak from six panels instead of four to get enough fullness to the cloak.)

Remember, I'm 5'6" and 130 lbs. These are the measurements that work for me. So you'll need to adjust these measurements to what works for you depending on your height and how broad in the shoulders you are. But the basic concept of how to cut the pieces out is the same. However, make a mock up or two with cheap fabric before you cut into your expensive fabric, that way you can work out all the bugs with the cheap fabric, so you can get it right with the expensive fabric the first time through!

Cut two rectangles of fabric measuring 60" by 75".



Set one rectangle aside, and cut the other one in half from corner to corner, creating two big right angle triangles.



Now get out a long piece of string and a marking pen or marking chalk. Lay down one of your triangles, and pin one end of your string to the top of the triangle. Make your string 75" long and attach your marking pen at the end of that 75" and draw an arc with a 75" radius all the way across the bottom of your triangle.



Cut the extra fabric off the bottom. Repeat this process with your second triangle. So you have two pieces that look like this.



Now we need to cut off the tops of the two triangles to make the neck line. Lay down one of your trangles, and measuring from the top of the triangle, measure down 10" and cut off a right angle triangle. This makes an 8" "neckline" at the top of your triangle. Why cut off a right angle triangle and not cut it off at an angle? Because this will give you nice straight sides at the front of your cloak, and give you that straightness down the back seam with more gathering at the sides that I mentioned above.



So now you've cut off the top of your triangle creating an 8" neckline area.



Depending on how broad you are across the shoulders, you may need this "neckline" to be a little wider. For me, measuring across my back from basically arm pit to arm pit is about 12 inches. So that 8" neckline worked out just fine.

Now repeat this process on your second triangle so you end up with two pieces that look like this. Now get out your other 60" by 75" rectangle, and repeat this whole process. So you end up with four pieces that look like this. Remember, your fabric has a right side and a wrong side. So if you created your first two triangles with your fabric right side up, then you're going to want to repeat this process for your second set of triangles with your fabric wrong side up.



Pick one of your four triangles that will be a side panel. Lay it down wrong side up, and pin a 1 1/2" hem along the 65" side of the triangle.





Now stitch your hem using a blind hem stitch. (I pin my blind hems a little weird, but if you need help with blind hems, check out this vid: How To Create a Blind Hem Stitch)

Once you're done stitching your hem, it will look something like this on the wrong side of your fabric panel:



And like this on the right side of your fabric panel:



This hem creates the hem seen here: Cloak side hem

Repeat this process on the triangle that will create the opposite side panel of your cloak.

Set your two side panels aside for the moment and pick up your last two triangles. These will be the left and right back panels of your cloak. Use a french seam to create the center seam down the back of your cloak. This will give you a nice finished seam on the inside of your cloak instead of a raw, ragged seam inside. To do this, with wrong sides of your fabric together, pin the two back panels of your cloak together down the 65" side. If you're not familar with french seams, this french seam tutorial might be helpful to read through first.



Stitch these two panels together using a straight stitch and a 1/4" seam allowance.



Your seam will look like this. If you have any fraying or long strings hanging off the edges, be sure to trim all this off. Or you can overlock stitch/serge the edge.



If your fabric can be ironed, open the seam up and press the seam allowance to one side.



Now fold the seam over so the right sides of your fabric are now together, and press your seam flat.



With right sides of your fabric together, pin your seam.



And now stitch a new seam using a straight stitch and a 1/2" seam allowance.



So your seam will look like this, with the raw edges of your fabric enclosed inside the seam.



And when you open it up, you'll have a nice finished seam on the inside of your cloak that looks like this.



And the center seam down the back of your cloak is complete.



Now attach the two side panels to your two back panels using the same french seam method.



With all four panels sewn together. It depends on how wide your fabric is and what measurements you use, but if you used 60" wide fabric or wider, then when laid out flat it should be close to a half circle.



Side panels folded over back panels.



Now we need to create this kind of shoulder pocket that you can see in Anakin's cloak. This little pocket seems to help somewhat with keeping the cloak on.

Should Pocket

To do this, start at the top of one of your side hems and measure down 5 or 6 ", then cut off a rounded piece starting from where your side panel meets your back panel and arcing around to your mark 5 or 6" inches down your side hem.





Do the same thing on both sides of your cloak.



Time to attach your cloak panels to your hood and tabards.

Lay your hood and tabards down with the opening of the hood facing down.



Make sure you have the center of your tabard marked.



With wrong side up, lay your cloak panels down over the hood and line up the back center seam of our cloak with the center mark of your tabard.



Pin your cloak panels down to the tabard.



And stitch it down with a straight stitch, then an overlocking stitch if you have a fabric that tends to fray.



Now pin the rest of your tabard closed on both sides.





And stitch your tabard closed the rest of the way, but only stitch up to, but not onto your side panel of your cloak. Do this on both sides.



Now lay your cloak down so that the hood opening is facing down and the wrong side of your cloak panels are facing down. At this point your tabards are still inside out.



Pull your tabards rightside out and press them flat.



Flip your cloak over, so the hood opening is now facing up, and the wrong side of your cloak panels are facing up.





Pin the other side of our tabard down to your cloak panels.





Now this seam needs to be stitched closed by hand so that you don't have a visible stitch line. So just use an invisible stitch or slip stitch to sew this seam closed. If you're not sure how to slip stitch a seam closed, you can read more about it here: How to Slip Stitch a Seam Closed






And now your cloak is almost done, just needs to be hemmed!




And with the hood flipped up out of the way so you can see how the tabard and cloak panels are sewn together.







Now it's time to hem your cloak. Put your tunic and tabards on as well as your boots. Put your cloak on, stand up nice and straight, and having someone pin up the hem of your cloak. Anakin's cloak nearly brushes the ground, so you'll want to pin your hem so it's maybe 1/2" inch or so above the ground while wearing your boots.

Once you get your hem pinned under, take off your cloak, and you'll want to hem the bottom of your cloak with at least a 2" hem. Most likely, you'll have extra fabric that needs to be cut off the bottom of your cloak, because of the extra "screw up" that we added at the beginning just in case we goofed on our measurements. Better to have too much fabric and have to cut some off to hem our cloak, than to not have enough fabric at the end of your cloak to correctly hem it, or end up with it having to be hemmed way too short.

Once you've cut off any extra fabric, pin your 2" hem into place. Before you start sewing your hem, it might be a good idea to put the cloak on again with your tunic, tabard, and boots just to double check your hem line. If all looks good, then go ahead and hem your cloak using a blind stitch hem (either by hand or on a machine) just like we did above to hem the two side panels of your cloak. This way the stitch line of the hem won't be visible on the outside of your cloak. I used red thread for this tutorial so it would be eaiser for you to see my stitch lines.




Now we need to hem the tabards. Anakin's tabards are hemmed slightly shorter than the rest of the cloak. They are hemmed at the top of his boots. I'm assuming this is so they can hang down in front while he walks without risk of being stepped on.

Tabard Hem 1
Tabard Hem 2

So once again, put your cloak on while wearing your tunic, tabards, and boots. Make sure the center seam of the hood is centered on the back of your neck. Stand up nice and straight, and having someone pin your tabards up so the bottom of your tabards are just above the top of the foot of your boots.



Just like with the back of the cloak, your tabards also probably have extra fabric that needs to be removed. So mark where your hem should be (I marked mine with pins), then cut off your extra fabric. I left three inches of fabric below the hemline on mine. You'll want to leave at least 1/2" below the hemline, but I left three inches on mine, in the hopes that the extra fabric will help add a little bit of weight to the end of the tabards.



Now open up the end of your tabard tuck the seam allowance you left below your hem marks up inside your tabard.



Smooth everything out nice and flat and pin it into place.



The bottom hem of your tabards will need to be hand stitched shut using an invisible stitch or slip stitch just like we did above to hand sew the under side of the tabard to the back and side panels of the cloak.




And that's a wrap, your cloak is now complete!!





Now from my experience when I originally attempted making this cloak for a generic jedi, this cloak really has a bad habit of wanting to slip off the back as soon as you start moving around. The shoulder pocket does help hold it on to a degree, but the way this cloak is designed and the weight of the big double layered hood, it's just very back heavy and the tabards don't seem to do much to help counter balance it. So it does have a tendancy to want to start sliding off down your back.

So this is the idea that I came up with when I originally was going to make this cloak to help it stay on. Again, this is just an idea, I haven't truly tested it out other than playing around with this mock up cloak and some scrap fabric, but it seems to work.

Basically I went with the sort of "shoulder holster" idea of having a strap that runs from behind the back of the neck, over the shoulders, under the arms, and behind the back. Like so:





I just used a scrap piece of fabric for this to demonstrate, so you'll need to figure out what kind of strapping to use, (nylon, fabric, leather), how to fasten it (velco, quick release clip, snap, buckle), and where to fasten it (behind the back, under the arm).

Your cloak can then be fastened to the strap at the back of the neck.



And then when you pull your cloak on over your shoulders, the straps are hidden, and your cloak can't slide off your back, because now your back and shoulders are holding it into place with the strap, and you're free to move around all you like without fear of losing your cloak! And it will help make sure your cloak goes on centered and stays that way.



And it should be really easy to keep the straps hidden by hiding them under your tabards. Especially if your cloak strap is the same color as your outer tunic. I used a piece of black fabric here, so you could see it better, but here's what I was thinking.




And with the tabards over top, the strap is pretty well hidden.





To make sure the straps stay hidden, it might be helpful to not only attach the cloak to the strap at the back of the neck, but possibly attach the cloak to the strap on top of the shoulders right before the straps go under the tabards as well.




If you try this method, let us know how it goes! Good luck with your project!
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Last edited by KrisAntilles (Amanda Burk) on Mon Mar 03, 2014 12:50 am; edited 14 times in total
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